Tag Archives: Black America

August Wilson August Wilson—A Great African Griot August Wilson—The Great American Playwright The son of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania—the storyteller—the poet Like Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass was an American Anthem So too is Wilson’s ten plays called the ‘Pittsburgh Cycle’ or the ‘Century Cycle’

This social timeline of African-Americans in the Twentieth Century is truly an American anthem. As Ma Rainey said in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, “Life’s way of talking, you don’t sing to feel better, you sing ‘cause that’s the way of understanding life.” For this matter, I feel compelled to respect Wilson’s conviction to convey these timeless stories. The Three Months of August by Chris Joseph Stancato The Three Months of August is based on the perspectives of the ‘Pittsburgh Read more [...]

Tibby’s Howl of Freedom

Tibby's Howl of Freedom

“I can’t find Tibby?” a rattled 10 years old girl named Rica said to her mother Britely who was cooking in the kitchen.

Together they frantically ran out of the apartment, down a flight of wet stairs and outside where Rica last saw her dog.

“Which way did she run?” Britely said.

“She saw a black cat, started to bark, and then,” Rica paused to catch her breath, “Tibby jerked and the leash slipped from my hand. I’m sorry momma—I’m sorry!” Rica began Read more [...]

Dopefiend—Donald Goines

Raw. This is the word that describes Dopefiend. Based in a Detroit ghetto, Goines tells you the story about his experiences as an addict. He places the reader in very uncomfortable situations: junkies getting their fix, prostitutes with their "johns,"  and the use of heroine being cooked up. Goines hits you with the needle that leaves a mark in your psyche.
Like any great novel, the unexpected is vital. In Dopefiend, the unexpected is deliberately disturbing. There are very few characters in this Read more [...]