All posts by orange

Death of a Dead Man—Marshall Boyd

DEATH OF A DEAD MAN—MARSHALL BOYD “What is unusual in Miami…? Everything is unusual,” Orlando Mano tells Falk McCoy on a corner street at his fruit stand near the Glades Hotel. “Death of a Dead Man” is Marshall Boyd’s second book in the Falk McCoy Mystery series. It is the prequel to “Faker” and it offers the reader an inside look at Boyd’s characters. “Faker” is a great mystery that stands on its own two feet. “Death of a Dead Man” compliments his first book. McCoy’s Read more [...]

Sparrow’s Nest

Sparrow's Nest DING! DING! “Oh C’mon man...are you kidding me...I can’t even enjoy a lunch break.” DING! DING! “I’m coming!” Jack screamed as he rushed through the garage to the gas pumps of the Sparrow service station in Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania. “Ok, that’s enough,” he said under his breath. There are no vehicles at the two gas pump islands. Just a scrawny kid named Anthony on his white and blue BMX bike. Anthony laughed from the top of his lungs at a nearby parking Read more [...]

Retirement in the Everglades

Retirement in the Everglades When they submerged Cantor’s body in the sawgrass marsh, there were gators that tore and gnawed until his five feet two inches frame was green and raw from the eventual decomposition. However, the human remains of Cantor’s departure remained relevant because of a father and son fishing trip. Gerry Torre’s nine year old son told his dad that he caught an Oscar, but to Gerry’s shock it was not a fish. It could be the possible missing person from the Miami Herald Read more [...]

Gas Station Ganja

Gas Station Ganja  is Available on Amazon Prologue Frank Martini, a soon to be senior at Belle Vernon Area High School, was working at the Brawn service station in the summer of 1979. An energy crisis had gripped the nation by the means of a gasoline shortage. Long lines to purchase gasoline were wrapped around city blocks, large and small. In the small town Belle Vernon, located in southwestern Pennsylvania, those same long lines went for miles from the only two service stations, Brawn and Read more [...]

The Unfortunates—B.S. Johnson

The Unfortunates A switch cycle of stories spread across my chess table, and like the game of chess, there is a first and last move—the variations are not in order. Twenty-seven short stories, to be more specific, some were one page, and others six, but all the stories were part of a timeline for me to choose my first story of B.S. Johnson’s, The Unfortunates. I parted the First and the Last pages before placing half of the remaining 25 pages clockwise, and then the other half counterclockwise. Read more [...]

NO NO: A DOCKUMENTARY

NO NO - A DOCKUMENTARY Initially, I had questions about the fact that Dock Ellis, who was pitching for the Pittsburgh Pirates, pitched a ‘No No,’ that is a no-hitter, against the San Diego Padres in 1971. How did he play, and play great, while on LSD? When did he realize that he was on his way to pitch a no-hitter? Where did he find the strike zone, even more, the catcher’s glove? Lastly…What was he thinking? All of these questions are answered by Dock. However, his drug use during Read more [...]

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

  Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas—Hunter S. Thompson Caution: Working lizard bouncing in Las Vegas. Be prepared to let Raoul Duke and Dr. Gonzo bend, bounce, and bound your fictional reading for a journalistic jolt of an ether experience. “Did you see the guy running after George Forman with a tennis racket?” said Hunter S. Thompson to George Plimpton, who was in the Hotel Inter-Continental in Zaire, Africa for the Ali vs Foreman fight. Plimpton writes in Shadow Boxer, “When Read more [...]

Plimpton!

Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself He was not born in the woods to be scared by an owl.  Shadow Box “A collection of experiences…no one could be that good—and Plimpton isn’t.” The documentary entitled, Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself, begins with the aforementioned as an introduction about his life as a “participatory journalist.” As one of the founders and editors of the Paris Review in 1953, a position in which he would have until his death, George Read more [...]

The Lords Notes on Visions—Jim Morrison

The Lords Notes on Visions   Jim Morrison (Selection Review) I’ve always had an appreciation of poetry, but I didn’t read it outside of the school curriculum. Morrison’s book of poems, The Lords and The New Creatures,  was the first book of poetry that I read and recited. I knew Jim Morrison was the lead singer for the Doors, but I didn’t know he had poetry published. In 1987 I was listening to everything from Pop to Reggae and Rap to Classic Rock. However, I was always intrigued Read more [...]

Hopscotch—Julio Cortázar

  Hopscotch—Julio Cortázar In the narrative of Cortázar’s Hopscotch, he analyzes the game of hopscotch after the main character, Oliveira, engages with a clocharde named Emmanuéle on the streets of Paris: “One day you learn how to leave Earth and make the pebble climb into Heaven…the worst part of it is that precisely at that moment…no one has learned how to make the pebble climb up into Heaven.” Cortázar continues this idea about failing to reach Heaven in the game: Read more [...]